Archive for the ‘Warblers’ Category

Palm Warbler (Dendroica palmarum)

Sunday, May 2nd, 2010

palm warbler

 

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Yellow Warbler (Dendroica petechia)

Saturday, May 2nd, 2009

One of the cutest little warblers ever!

 

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The male.

Small warbler with olive-yellow upperparts and bright yellow underparts with rust-brown streaks on breast, sides. Wings are dark with two white bars. Tail is dark with yellow-tinged edges. Has a wider range than any other North American warbler. Eats insects, larvae, and some fruit.

Preferred habitats include edges of marshes and swamps, willow-lined streams, leafy bogs, thickets, orchards, farmlands, forest edges, and suburban yards and gardens.

 

 

 

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This is the female.

The nests of the Yellow Warbler are frequently parasitized by the Brown-headed Cowbird. The warbler often builds a new nest directly on top of the parasitized one, sometimes resulting in nests with up to six tiers.

Preferred habitats include edges of marshes and swamps, willow-lined streams, leafy bogs, thickets, orchards, farmlands, forest edges, and suburban yards and gardens.

 

 

 

 

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The basic mating song of the yellow warbler is often written as “sweet-sweet-sweeter-than-sweet” or “sweet-sweet-I’m-so-sweet”, but males sing various other songs as well, some of which resemble those of the magnolia or chestnut-sided warbler or the American redstart.

Yellow-rumped Warbler (Dendroica coronata)

Wednesday, April 29th, 2009

 

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Three to five brown and gray marked, white to creamy white eggs are laid in a bulky nest made of twigs, rootlets, and grass, lined with hair and feathers, and built in a conifer. Incubation ranges from 12 to 13 days and is carried out by the female.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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In summer, both sexes are a smart gray with flashes of white in the wings and yellow on the face, sides, and rump. Males are very strikingly shaded; females are duller and may show some brown. Winter birds are paler brown, with bright yellow rump and usually some yellow on the sides.

 

 

 

 

 

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The Yellow-rumped Warbler is the only warbler able to digest the waxes found in bayberries and wax myrtles. Its ability to use these fruits allows it to winter farther north than other warblers,

sometimes as far north as Newfoundland.

Yellow-rumped Warblers are common and widespread. Their populations are stable or increasing in most areas. Migrating Yellow-rumped Warblers, like many migrants, are frequently killed in collisions with radio towers, buildings, and other obstructions.